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How to communicate well with babies from newborn to 1-2 years old

You can do a lot to encourage your baby's communication skills long before he/she becomes your non-stop little chatterbox. It's easy. All you need to do is smile, talk, sing, and read a lot to your baby.

How to communicate well with babies from newborn to 1-2 years old


It's one of the biggest questions of your baby's first year: Will your little bundle of joy say "Mama" or “Dada" first? You'll probably hear that special first word by the time your baby turns 1 or 1.5 years old. In fact, you can do a lot to encourage your baby's communication skills long before he/she becomes your non-stop little chatterbox. It's easy. All you need to do is smile, talk, sing, and read a lot to your baby.

Long before they can speak clearly, babies understand the general meaning of what you're saying. You can enhance your baby's listening skills by often talking to him/her throughout the day. Though you may find it silly, by narrating your activities together, like talk as you're feeding, dressing, carrying, and bathing, you help your baby acquire speech and language skills faster, as he/she can start to associate these sounds of language with everyday objects and activities.

Loving attention is the fundamental element of communicating with your newborn. Smile often at your baby, especially when he/she is cooing, gurgling, or otherwise vocalising with baby talk, as babies do absorb emotional tone. Be patient when you are trying to decode your infant's baby talk and nonverbal communication. Because little things like facial expressions, gurgling, or babbling sounds can signal either frustration or joy. When your baby babbles and laughs, look at him/her attentively, don’t look away, interrupt or talk with someone else, as your baby is trying to communicate with you, so let him/her "speak" to you with the baby talk. Remember, right from the start, the baby talk should be a two-way street, so it’s essential to have back-and-forth conversations in baby talk to teach your baby the give-and-take of adult conversation, do your best to respond, even when you don't understand what your baby is trying to say.

 

You can also give your baby teething toys. Besides alleviating discomfort for teething babies, mouthing and munching on the right teethers, it also encourages a baby to move their tongue, which helps laying the foundation for learning speech sounds. You may want to understand more about the teether for your kids , please see below : http://bit.ly/2Z07l5I

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